SAVE THE DATE – WATER SYSTEM SURCHARGE COMMUNITY INFORMATIONAL MEETING

MARCH 5th, 3 – 5 P.M.
BEACH CLUB

The PLVC Utilities Committee is hosting a Informational Meeting where OWSI will explain the application they are making to the Washington State Utilities and Transportation Commission (UTC) for a new water treatment surcharge. The funds from the surcharge will be used construct a filtration system to meet Washington State Department of Health (DOH) regulations. The proposed surcharge will amount to $5 per month for each customer. Representatives from the UTC, DOH, OWSI’s engineering consultant, and OWSI will be in attendance to present the details and to answer questions.

A FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) link will be created on the PLVC website, where answers to questions about the surcharge will be posted. Furthermore, if you have additional questions, please Contact Us.

We look forward to seeing you on March 5th.

Russ Michel
Utilities Committee Chair

PUD UPDATE

During the discussions surrounding the PUD’s recently passed 2019 budget, General Manager Larry Dunbar stated the goal to heighten focus on improving the customer experience, crew safety, and overall system reliability.

Recent near system-wide transmission outages have led the PUD to survey its transmission corridor for potential tree hazards. Trees are the PUD’s number one cause of outages.

The 30 – 45-year-old aging electric distribution infrastructure also fails from time-to-time resulting in an outage. During the last six weeks the PUD has experienced three faults in the underground cable along Swansonville Road which serves as the primary feeder for power to Port Ludlow. These faults have led to the repeated loss of power for thousands of customers in the Port Ludlow area. In 2016 and 2017 only one fault occurred. The underground cable is approximately 9,000 lineal feet. It is the original cable and is at the end of its service life.

To improve system reliability, the PUD recently finished the installation of a new conduit system for the first 2,700 lineal feet along Swansonville Road. Beginning Saturday December 15th, the PUD will begin installing about 600 feet of cable into the new conduit, including the section where the most recent faults occurred. PUD crews may be closing one lane of Swansonville Road which could extend into next week. Flaggers will be on site. PUD staff are continuing to evaluate the cost and timeline to complete the remainder of the project and will present the findings to the Board of Commissioners in the new year.

You can continue to keep up-to-date by visiting the PUD website at www.jeffpud.org

Russ Michel
PLVC Utilities Chair

NOTICE TO WATER SYSTEM USERS- TOTAL COLIFORM DETECTED AND TEMPORARY WATER SYSTEM CHLORINATION

NOTICE TO WATER SYSTEM USERS

COLIFORM MAXIMUM CONTAMINATE LEVEL (MCL) EXCEEDED – NON-ACUTE MCL AND TEMPORARY WATER SYSTEM CHLORINATION

Beginning Wednesday, October 10, 2018 we will be feeding a small amount of chlorine which will possibly become apparent at the customer taps.  This is being done as part of the investigation of a routine bacteriological sample testing positive for Total Coliform (negative for possible disease causing e-coli and fecal coliform)

AFFECTED AREA:  Service zone “B” is the area located east of Oak Bay Road. (See map on last page) This service zone originates at the well sites south east of Olympic Terrace 2 and supplies water to customers from the well sites North to Montgomery Court. The only Properties west of Oak Bay Road to receive water from these wells are the commercial development containing the Dental Office, Sound Bank and Coldwell Banker. The area is served by Wells 14 and 16 and Reservoirs C and D

THE REASON: OLYMPIC WATER & SEWER, INC. Water System, I.D. 68700L, located in Jefferson County submitted routine drinking water samples to a certified laboratory for the month of  September 2018 for total coliform analysis.  The sample was collected on September 25, 2018.

The test results indicated that there was Total Coliform bacteria present in the sample but no fecal or E. Coli.

The samples were taken from a routine sample station at 412 Camber Lane.  Because of the configuration of the water pipes, we are confident that the only properties potentially affected are in service zone area “B” as described above.

PRECAUTIONS:  Since only Total Coliform has been detected, there is no immediate health risk to our customers.  If an immediate health risk had existed, you would have been notified right away. However, as a precaution the Washington State Department of Health has recommend that if you are currently taking chemotherapy, undergoing kidney dialysis, or have an immune deficiency you may want boil  water. Total Coliforms are common in the environment and are generally not harmful themselves, however any indication of contamination is thoroughly investigated.

INVESTIGATION: The following investigation and follow up actions are being taken in consultation with Washington State Department of Health:

All of the wells and Teal lake reservoir that serves the area were tested for coliforms.  The samples from the wells and Teal Lake reservoir were negative. Samples were pulled at the 412 Camber Lane sample station and at homes near the sample station in accordance with the OWSI coliform monitoring plan. The only follow up sample to have coliform present was located at 412 Camber Lane. On October 4 a sample was collected at reservoir “C” at the top of Highland Drive (past the golf course pro shop) that tested positive. A negative sample was collected on October 5 at reservoir “C. Flushing and retesting have provided results that are indicating coliform results that were very inconsistent. Due to those inconsistent results chlorination is the next step in eliminating the coliform.

OWSI has retained HDR Consulting Engineers to guide OWSI through the process of determining the source of the coliform. Once the source has been identified OWSI will take appropriate actions to eliminate the risk of future events.

Summary of Samples and Lab Analysis:  (all negative for e-coli)

  • Initial samples on Camber Lane: Positive for Total Coliform
  • Follow up on samples on Camber Lane.: Positive for Total Coliform
  • Wells 14 and 16: Negative for all coliform
  • Sample at Reservoir C (Highland Drive): Positive for Total Coliform
  • Sample at Reservoir D (Teal Lake Rd.): Negative for Total Coliform

 While we continue our investigation we have decided that the most efficient way to cure the problem is through a light chlorination.   We will continue this for up to two weeks, or until all of our follow up samples show that the problem has been corrected.

While we strive to deliver the highest quality water possible to our customers, unfortunately situations such as this do occur periodically in a non-chlorinated system.  Thank you for your understanding and patience.  Please do not hesitate to call us with questions.

Sincerely,

Greg Rae
Manager
Olympic Water and Sewer Inc.
360-437-7898
Email:  owsi@portludlowassociates.com

Below is further information from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regarding Total Coliform.

The following is mandatory language required by the Environmental Protection Agency in these situations.  .

 The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets water standards and has determined that the presence of total coliforms is a possible health concern.  Total coliforms are common in the environment and are generally not harmful themselves.  The presence of these bacteria in drinking water, however, generally is a result of a problem with water treatment or the pipes which distribute the water, and indicates that the water may be contaminated with organisms that can cause disease.  Disease symptoms may include diarrhea, cramps, nausea, and possibly jaundice, and any associated headaches and fatigue.  These symptoms, however, are not just associated with the disease causing organisms in drinking water, but may also be caused by a number of other factors other than your drinking water.  EPA has set an enforceable drinking water standard for total coliforms to reduce the risk of these adverse health effects.  Drinking water which meets this standard is usually not associated with a health risk from disease-causing bacteria and should be considered

 

Service Zone B is the unshaded area of the map

2018 YEAR END REVIEW

The Port Ludlow Village Council has had a busy and community-building year, from completing one new trail while maintaining others, working with Jefferson Healthcare to enhance the Port Ludlow Clinic’s exterior, hosting county political candidate forums, realizing substantial growth of the Emergency Management activities, holding the annual Newcomer Welcome Event and various Health & Wellness forums, and managing the Movie Night while developing our new logo and mission statement to reinvigorate our purpose to unify and improve our great community.

To all our committee chairs, generous contributors and volunteers, a huge debt of gratitude is owed to you for your commitment and generosity throughout the year.  We simply would not be the Port Ludlow we know and love without you. Following is a compilation of the goals, objectives and accomplishments of those who work so hard year-round to make our community a place to enjoy. An Honor Roll of the volunteers is included at the end of the review.

Administration— Maintain and update organizational and procedural policies.

Chair:  Tamra McDearmid

The Committee worked to update the Policy and Procedures consistent with the revised Articles and Bylaws.  In addition, they established new procedures for the election, which were tested for the 2018 election.  Both of these activities will be finalized and recommended for board approval in the near future.

CommunicationsProvide streamlined communications to share relevant community/area information and maintain contact with the community regarding PLVC activities through its website, email list as well as continued archiving of important documents.

Chair: Caleb Summerfelt

PLVC’s communication efforts were well received this year with the most commonly visited web pages being the Osprey Trail Progress and Emergency Management Information.  The information provided regarding the change in Jefferson County Property Tax process was particularly effective in March of this year.  As of September this year the PLVC website hosted 6,259 unique views with the most common inquiries going to HOA’s and CC&R’s, and information about Recycling.  Additionally, the PLVC Archive was moved to a more secure platform.

The newly implemented E-blast schedule has worked very well, whereby the community is notified two weeks prior to an upcoming event and a follow-up blast is sent two days prior to an event.  This has resulted in increased attendance at many of the PLVC sponsored community functions.

Community DevelopmentMaintain a relationship with the developer, the county and neighboring property owners.

Chairs: Dave McDearmid and Dave Jurca

The Community Development Committee transitioned this year with a change in leadership and committee members.  They continue to be committed to a proactive approach to identify and fulfill activities in support of the committee’s charter which is to: (1) maintain a relationship with the developer to keep lines of communications open to share important development activities with the community, assist with compliance to the Development Agreement and County regulations, address the feasibility of additional developments and/or enhancements the community desires, and address the “workings” of the MPR after the build-out is complete; (2) maintain a relationship with appropriate County officials to support the remaining build-out of the MPR, preserve and maintain the intent of the MPR after the Development Agreement, and address issues that may arise requiring the County’s intervention; and, (3) foster relationships with neighboring property owners, such as Olympic Resource Management, to address activities that may impact the MPR.

Dog ParkAn investigation into the possibility of a dog park within the Master Planned Resort of Port Ludlow. 

Co-chairs: Phyllis and Glenn Waldenberg

The committee members took an informal poll of residents, which showed that 70 per cent of the respondents would support a dog park.  Based on these results, the committee researched other dog parks in the area, investigated costs, and determined the specific costs, requirements and codes.  They then met with the representative from Port Ludlow Associates (PLA) to determine a site for the park. PLA indicated that they would be willing to donate space at the corner of Marina Drive and Oak Bay Drive as part of a future development.

The committee drew up plans for the park along with cost estimates, which were presented to the Homeowner’s Associations surrounding the tentative site.  Unfortunately, the surrounding HOA’s and neighborhoods determined that the site was not appropriate for that use and voted against the proposal.

The committee is open to investigate other sights within the MPR and hopes to develop a dog park at some future date.  

Emergency ManagementEstablish and maintain a disaster based emergency plan for Port Ludlow working with county and state agencies.

Chair: Danille Turissini

With a new motto, “We are stronger when we prepare together” Emergency Management was revitalized by the addition of participation from the Jefferson County Department of Emergency Management, a new Citizen Emergency Response Team (CERT) coordinator and a Disaster Airlift Response Team (DART) coordinator.  With these new team members the committee has expanded its already successful Block Captain program made up of neighborhood volunteers who will be the first to organize and coordinate help in the event of an emergency. In addition an initiative to encourage businesses to prepare a plan of action for the first 30 days has also been established.

All of these efforts were showcased at the Second Annual Emergency Management Fair held in June, which had over 100 attendees.  Many tasty and some not so tasty examples of emergency preparedness food were sampled.  In addition, attendees learned how to “camp in their homes” safely turn off utilities, effectively store water and food supplies, and try out the wide variety of emergency gadgets available for purchase.

Further efforts this year have included Red Cross First Aid classes, additional DART training and the October 18 Great Washington Shake Out earthquake simulation and communication event.

Health & Wellness Provide to the community Health and Wellness events sponsored by Jefferson Healthcare and others.

Co-chairs: Paul Hinton and Phyllis Waldenberg

This revitalized committee has partnered with Jefferson Healthcare to bring to Port Ludlow several first rate seminars facilitated by the doctors in residence.  They have presented in-depth information on such subjects as strokes, cardiovascular health and orthopedics to our community with an outlook to expanding the program in the coming year.

Holiday Lights A holiday tradition at the village square 

Chair: Dave McDearmid

The Holiday Lights tradition has brought a twinkle to our long winter nights and holiday season for many years.  The lights go up before Thanksgiving in order to be turned on for the holiday season, and remain up until the beginning of March thanks to the many volunteers who give of their time and energy to organize, test and install the lights.  Much appreciated is the work of WAVE Broadband who donate their crews and bucket trucks to help in the loftier elevations of the trees.  Fortunately this year, the weather cooperated and the installation was completed in record time.  Unfortunately, two more trees were lost due to storm damage and had been removed by the county.   There are now 16 of the original 24 trees planted years ago.

Fundraising efforts to support this endearing community activity were a great success.  Thanks to the many donors who gave generously to allow for payment of traffic control during installation as well as miscellaneous materials, light replacements and items damaged due to exposure in our Northwest winters. The committee looks forward to continuing the tradition of the holiday lights and adding a bit of sparkle to Port Ludlow’s Village Center.

MaritimeMonitor boating activity and provide a safe Port Ludlow Marina experience

Chair: Phil Otness

Port Ludlow can claim bragging rights on a beautiful setting for its Marina and boating facility and the committee has worked hard to continue to keep the area safe, inviting and friendly.  As a result of these efforts, Port Ludlow’s marina continues to host an increasing number of visitors each year.  The biggest challenge with the increase in tourism is the up tick in the use of standup paddleboards, kayaks, and other water transportation as well as the use of high-speed tenders which continue to be a safety problem, although most users are following the posted signs of 5 MPH.  A current project is to replace the entrance buoy, which will emphasize the speed limits, however, the expense is considerable with new Department of Natural Resources requirements.

Monitoring the illegal anchorage of boats in the Marina requires that a watchful eye as well as the authority to present the offenders with a letter explaining that after 30 days, the offending vessel must vacate the marina.  The committee has excelled at keeping the area in excellent shape while continuing to be as accommodating as possible.

Movie NightA community wide event inviting participation from outside Port Ludlow encouraging locals and tourists alike to enjoy an outdoor movie on the marina lawn.

Co-chairsTam McDearmid and Pat Page

The Village Council took over management of the Port Ludlow Free Movie Night after the previous organizers had determined we were best equipped to maintain the momentum of this extremely popular community event.

The movie selection was determined by the students of Chimacum Creek Primary School who overwhelmingly voted for WALL-E as their favorite.

Sponsorships were solicited from various businesses, which had supported the event previously as well as several new contributors.  The committee raised $5,400.  In addition, there was an advertising fund provided by the State of Washington in the amount of $3,900 which was used to it’s full advantage in spreading the word about our event on five separate ferry routes, on Facebook, a billboard in Poulsbo and banners and signs placed in Kitsap, Jefferson and Clallam counties.

The event hosted six food vendors and one flower vendor, lost and found/first aid station and a PLVC booth of movie themed novelty items for sale. There were also raffle items including a ukulele, television, tablet, birthday party basket, and Hood Canal boat cruise.

Despite the drizzle and light rain on the day of the event, the vendors arrived and set up shop with delicious food, flowers and toys.

The Jefferson County Chamber compiled the attendance numbers by county and we were happy to report that a total of 412 people attended the event including 23 from out of state and 17 from Canada, 6 from Mexico and 3 from Spain.

Roadway Safety Monitor Port Ludlow Roadways and make recommendations to the County for improved infrastructure, lighting and signage 

Chair: Steve Frenzl

This past year, the Roadway Safety Committee successfully worked with the county make several safety improvements on our roads.  After holding two public hearings at Port Ludlow’s Beach and Bay Clubs the committee determined several action items to be discussed with the County.  Subsequently, the installation of a streetlight on Paradise Bay Road at the entrance to the Bay Club was completed and the temporary traffic control speed monitors were set up on Paradise Bay Road.  Future projects will focus on the intersections adjacent to the Beach Club and Bay Club and the zone along Oak Bay Road where community trails cross the highway at numerous points.  

Trails & Natural ResourcesDevelop and maintain the trails and natural resources of the community and promote community awareness and appreciation of the established walking and biking trails. 

Chairs: John Fillers and Tim Rensema.

Every year the trails committee relies on its four sponsors, LMC, PLA PLVC, and SBCA for their equal donations, which makes it possible to fulfill their mission. Over 50 volunteers contribute many hours as trails stewards and workers on special projects.

This year, in addition to the regular mowing, weed whacking, clipping and downed tree removal activities, the group further developed and repaired three of the seventeen trails which total 26 plus miles of walking, hiking and biking opportunities.

Those three trails include Osprey, Interpretive/Ludlow Falls Loop and Picnic Point.  Osprey is the newest trail and quickly becoming a favorite.  Terraced steps and cleanup of the Native Plant Garden were undertaken in the Interpretive Trail and the Picnic Point Trail received a facelift, which eliminated the mud problem and now allows for a pleasant walk year round.

Other activities include the annual Scotch Broom Sweep, the cleaning of 54 birdhouses and the addition of new shelters, chain saw use training, and completion of the map of the trails.  Additionally, a long-range plan and organization, policy and procedures documents were approved to help the committee to work better toward their future goals.

Welcome EventAn annual event to encourage the newcomers to Port Ludlow to meet and speak to the social, sports, and service organizations in the community.

Co-chairs: Phyllis Waldenberg and Pat Page

Thanks to funding from LMC, PLVC and SBCA the Welcome Event was a huge success. This year’s event was held on a beautiful Wednesday, July 11 at the Bay Club where approximately 77 newcomers attended with 41 clubs and organizations and for the first time, 8 businesses participating in the meet and greet event.  Along with the free food and refreshments beautifully displayed with donated centerpieces, there were raffle items that were taken home by two very lucky new Port Ludlow residents.  Shuttle service was provided to satellite parking areas to avoid congestion at the Bay Club parking lot.

Utilities & RecyclingMaintain communications with all utilities with affect Port Ludlow.

Chairs:  Russ Michel and Austin Kerr, Recycling

This year the Utilities Committee’s main focus has been to track the geoduck issue, which had not been resolved in 2017.  In 2016 Olympic Water and Sewer, Inc. (OWSI) and Larry Smith, President began working with the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) on the sewer outfall easement with an initial charge of $134,000 per year.  After two years of work that included underwater surveys, studying pipeline alternatives, and direct negotiations, an amount of only $8,500 per year was assessed.  This resulted in a bi-monthly rate increase of only $2.00 per ratepayer.  The cost to perform the surveys and alternatives studies was $79,082 which OWSI will recover with the stated bi-monthly surcharge.

We are fortunate to have within our community a convenient and comprehensive recycling station.  However, reported misuse of the bins has continued and the Utilities Committee responded to a request for improved signage.  In addition, changes in the international recycle market have posed a challenge to county officials to maintain a viable recycling program.  An education campaign is underway to improve recycling practices and new signs have been posted.  The County introduced the motto “When in Doubt, Throw it Out” in an effort to reduce the amount of trash that is placed in the recycle bins.

NOTICE TO WATER SYSTEM USERS FROM OLYMPIC WATER & SEWER, INC.

COLIFORM MAXIMUM CONTAMINATE LEVEL (MCL) EXCEEDED – NON-ACUTE MCL AND TEMPORARY WATER SYSTEM CHLORINATION

Beginning Wednesday, January 10, 2018 we will be feeding a small amount of chlorine which will possibly become apparent at the customer taps. This is being done as part of the investigation of a routine bacteriological sample testing positive for Total Coliform (negative for possible disease causing e-coli and fecal coliform). Please see “PRECAUTIONS” below for more information.

AFFECTED AREA: The South Bay service area lying east of the Ludlow Creek and the North Bay service area east of Oak Bay Road. Additional to this are customers on Osprey Ridge downhill of Wren Ct. including the commercial development containing Snug Harbor Cafe, Dental Office, Sound Bank and Coldwell Banker. The area is served by Wells 14 and 16 and Reservoirs C and D

THE REASON: OLYMPIC WATER & SEWER, INC. Water System, I.D. 68700L, located in Jefferson County submitted routine drinking water samples to a certified laboratory for the month of December 2017 for total coliform analysis. The sample was collected on December 13, 2017.

The test results indicated that there was Total Coliform bacteria present in the sample but no fecal or E. Coli.

 The samples were taken from routine sample stations at 142 Crestview Drive and 92 Dunsmuir Rd. Because of the configuration of the water pipes, we are confident that the only properties potentially affected are in the South Bay Service area and (south and east) of Oak Bay Road with the exception of the Loomis Properties Commercial area.

PRECAUTIONS: Since only Total Coliform has been detected, there is no immediate health risk to our customers. If an immediate health risk had existed, you would have been notified right away. However, as a precaution the Washington State Department of Health has recommend that if you are currently taking chemotherapy, undergoing kidney dialysis, or have an immune deficiency you may want boil water. Total Coliforms are common in the environment and are generally not harmful themselves, however any indication of contamination is thoroughly investigated.

INVESTIGATION: The following investigation and follow up actions are being taken in consultation with Washington State Department of Health:

All of the wells and storage reservoirs that serve the area were tested for total coliforms. The samples from the wells were negative, however the reservoirs on Teal Lake Rd. and at the top of Highland Drive (past the golf course pro shop) tested positive as well as the follow up sample from the original sampling areas on Crestview Drive and Dunsmuir Rd. Weeks of flushing and retesting have provided results that are indicating low level coliform to no coliform results that are very inconsistent. Due to those inconsistent results chlorination is the next step in eliminating the coliform.

Summary of Samples and Lab Analysis: (all negative fore-coli)

  • Initial samples on Crestview Drive and Dunsmuir Rd.: Positive for Total Coliform
  • Follow up on samples on Crestview Drive and Dunsmuir Rd.: Positive for Total Coliform
  • Wells 14 and 16: Negative for all coliform
  • Sample at Reservoir C (Highland Drive): Positive for Total Coliform
  • Sample at Reservoir D (Teal Lake ): Positive for Total Coliform

While we continue our investigation we have decided that the most efficient way to cure the problem is through a light chlorination. We will continue this for up to two weeks, or until all of our follow up samples show that the problem has been corrected.

While we strive to deliver the highest quality water possible to our customers, unfortunately situations such as this do occur periodically in a non-chlorinated system. Thank you for your understanding and patience. Please do not hesitate to call us with questions.

Sincerely,

Larry Smith
President
(360) 437-8246 direct
(360) 437-2101 main office

Greg Rae
Operations Supervisor
(360) 437-7898

Email:  owsi@portludlowassociates.com

Below is further information from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regarding Total Coliform.

The following is mandatory language required by the Environmental Protection Agency in these situations.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets water standards and has determined that the presence of total coliforms is a possible health concern.  Total coliforms are common in the environment and are generally not harmful themselves.  The presence of these bacteria in drinking water, however, generally is a result of a problem with water treatment or the pipes which distribute the water, and indicates that the water may be contaminated with organisms that can cause disease.  Disease symptoms may include diarrhea, cramps, nausea, and possibly jaundice, and any associated headaches and fatigue.  These symptoms, however, are not just associated with the disease causing organisms in drinking water, but may also be caused by a number of other factors other than your drinking water.  EPA has set an enforceable drinking water standard for total coliforms to reduce the risk of these adverse health effects.  Drinking water which meets this standard is usually not associated with a health risk from disease-causing bacteria and should be considered safe.

Jefferson PUD Staff Recommendation to Install Smart Meters

To: PLVC Board
From: PLVC Utilities Committee
Subject: Jefferson PUD Staff Recommendation to Install Smart Meters
Date: November 21, 2017

The Utilities Committee met today with Jefferson PUD Commissioner Wayne King and Acting General Manager Kevin Streett, concerning the PUD staff’s recommendation to install new Itron Smart Meters replacing a “hodgepodge” of old and failing electric meters throughout the service territory. There is a small minority of customers organized as the Smart Meters Objections Group (SMOG) that have raised concerns and objections to moving forward with this project. Their concerns center upon privacy, radio frequency (RF) emissions, and other miscellaneous issues. We reviewed these issues and believe they have very little merit. This statement is based on the career backgrounds of several Committee members.

Kevin summarized for the Committee the advantages of installing the meters which included:

  1. More accurate meter readings. Many of the analog meters are up to 40 years old and are losing or have lost 1 – 3 percent accuracy. It is estimated that by installing the new smart meters, the PUD could realize an additional $1.1M revenue per year which is a conservative estimate. In addition, the old meters are failing by the hundreds per year. The PUD can’t keep up with the second hand purchasing of enough old meters needed to work in present system we inherited from    Note –  is there is not a current supplier for the older-style analog electric meters.
  2. The crew time to repair/replace meters is very costly and takes away time from other top priority
  3. The required staff time monthly is substantial to read meters. Also, two on-site visits to the subject property are required to disconnect and reconnect meters, due to moving, late bill payment, or when asked to do so by the Fire Department. Again – substantial staff time is
  4. The PUD currently is paying over $300K per year to an outside vendor for reading some meters. Implementing smart meters throughout the service territory would eliminate this
  5. The recommended smart meters will avoid the above problems as they will send information to PUD where meters can be read, and remotely turned off and on. Also, the individual customer can take better control of their electric usage and monitor via a website should they choose to do
  6. Most important is the automatic notification to the PUD of outages – a huge concern to the aging population of Port Ludlow. Installing smart meters will save crew time and reduce the response and length of outages. During a storm event, PUD crews can earn double or even triple overtime in an effort to restore

The above advantages of having the smart meters installed will save the PUD ratepayers somewhere between $1 million and $1.5 million per year. The cost of the new smart meters and installation would be amortized in less than three years if the project were implemented in a one-year timeframe. From a fiscal, operations, and efficiency standpoint it makes sense for the PUD to move forward with this project.

The Utilities Committee therefore recommends to the PLVC Board that the Board write an email to the three Commissioners (commissioners@jeffpud.org) recommending installation of the smart meters ASAP and that Port Ludlow Community would be glad to be first in line.

Enclosure: Article which appeared in The Leader on November 8, 2017.

Russ Michel
PLVC Utilities Committee Chair

(Note: This memo was approved unanimously at the Utilities Committee meeting on November 21, 2017)

2017 YEAR END REVIEW

The purpose of the PLVC as stated in our Article of Incorporation continues to be threefold: Be a unifying force by building consensus, maintain and preserve trails and open space, promote the general interests of the community. To accomplish those purposes, the past year has seen the settlement of the tree harvest dispute in conjunction with LMC

OWSI COMMENTS ON ARSENIC LEVELS

Due to the numerous postings on Nextdoor about Arsenic in recent days, OWSI has provided the following information:

The portion of the Port Ludlow water system that supplies South Bay and customers in North Bay East and South of Oak Bay Road are served by blended water from Wells 14 and 16. This blending is done because Well 14 has a higher level of Arsenic and blending it with water from Well 16 results in water that is below the Washington State Department of Health maximum contamination level of 10 parts per billion (ppb). Other customers, in North Bay, are served by wells that do not have higher levels of Arsenic.

OWSI samples the blended water from Wells 14 and 16 on a quarterly basis and the laboratory submits the results directly to the State. Over the past year, the sample results are as follows:

2015
Average 8.4 ppb
2016 March 5.9 ppb
May 9.6 ppb
September 8.1 ppb
November 9.0 ppb
2017 January (Private Sample) 8.0 ppb

OWSI has prepared an information sheet on Arsenic which can be accessed by going to UTILITIES COMMITTEE PAGE. If you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact Larry Smith, OWSI President at 360-437-8246. The State Department of Health recommends if you have any concern about health risks, you should seek advice from your health provider.

Douglas Huber, Chair
PLVC Utilities Committee

PUD UPDATE

The PLVC Utilities Committee met with representatives of PUD, Jim Parker, General Manager, Bill Graham, District Resource Manager, and Kevin Streett, District Electrical Superintendent.  The guests discussed how their billing system works and answered questions that have been raised by the community.

They indicated that PUD collects meter reading by radio equipment which automatically updates the billing system; it is not manually entered into customer’s billings.  The older meters are mechanical and could be giving slightly lower readings due to wear; but, it is virtually impossible for them to “overread” resulting in higher charges to customers.  Customers are encouraged to compare their actual meter readings to what is shown on their statement.  Taking a picture with a smartphone or camera about mid-month is an easy way to do that.