2020 YEAR IN REVIEW

President’s Message – Bill Dean

COVID-19 was a game changer!  As soon as it hit, a Task Force was formed drawing from Emergency Management and Health & Wellness Committees.  While the community (and the World) remained in various degrees of lockdown, the Task Force provided Weekly Updates of what was happening, what the regulations were and acted as a communications conduit to and from the community to health officials at JeffCo and Jefferson Healthcare.  After a successful start of Health and Wellness programs before the pandemic, it had to be shelved until September when Jefferson Healthcare commenced an online version.  While many activities were put on hold, a successful new Tree Lighting took place in the Village Center before the pandemic, use of the bay by boaters increased exponentially and the Maritime Committee provided guidance to them for the safety and enjoyment of everyone.  Increased use of the trails as allowed outdoor recreation required continual work by that dedicated Committee. The other thing that has not changed is the dedication of the volunteers who are listed on the Honor Roll at the end of this Review.    Financially our revenue decreased by $3,780 to $15,839 but expenditures decreased by $8,994 to $15,495.   The net effect is a cash surplus of $344 for the year which increased our reserve to $24,006.  This is the first year in the last five when revenue exceeded expenditures.  This has certainly been a strange year and as I leave the board after seven years, I want to specially acknowledge the fellow board members that have supported me and the community to enhance our wonderful village in the woods by the bay.  Thank you all.

Administration – Chair: Tamra McDearmid
Maintain and update organizational and procedural policies.

The Administration Committee continued to maintain the Articles of Incorporation, Bylaws, and Policies & Procedures. After the 2019 Election, some of the election procedures were modified, and the Policies & Procedures were amended accordingly. A complete review of the Bylaws and Policies & Procedures was undertaken and determined no changes were necessary due to COVID-19.

Administration is also responsible for handling the yearly Board Election. A team was formed to produce the Election Ballot Packet. Results will be announced at the Annual Meeting.

Communications – Chair: Mike Towner
To build Village Council awareness, participation, and appreciation among Port Ludlow residents.

The primary focus of Communications this year has been in support of the COVID-19 Task Force and its dissemination of pandemic-related information relevant to the Port Ludlow community. Weekly eblasts have been sent each Tuesday since February summarizing the JeffCo Board of County Commissioners weekly meetings, especially Dr. Locke’s health advisories and the Governor’s plans for re-opening. The Village Council website created a landing page devoted to COVID-19 topics and activities. Ongoing activities include a redesign of the Web page to make it easier to navigate pandemic information, since the sheer volume of articles can be overwhelming at times.  Maintaining the Port Ludlow Archive of community-wide documents is a continuing responsibility.

Community Development – Chair: Dave McDearmid
Maintain a relationship with the developer, the county and neighboring property owners.

The Committee maintains relationships with the developer, the county and neighboring property owners for the benefit of Port Ludlow.  This year we were pleased to co-sponsor the Village Tree Lighting ceremony with Port Ludlow Associates and to complete refurbishment of the wooden roadside signs welcoming people to Port Ludlow.  We continue to work on expansion of the Port Ludlow No Shooting Zone and with PLA on various enhancements within our Village.

Community Open House — Chair: Rita Garcia
An annual event to encourage newcomers and long-term residents of Port Ludlow to meet and speak to social, sports, business, and service organizations of the community.

The Community Open House (formally known as the Community Welcome Event), is a joint activity funded by the Village Council, LMC and SBCA, and has been managed by the Village Council’s Committee for the past few years.  This year the Committee recommended a name change to make it more inclusive, and to reflect that the event is for all in Port Ludlow, newcomers as well as long-term residents.

This year’s planning efforts were underway before COVID-19 surfaced and the Community Open House became a virtual one.  Clubs and organizations would be showcased on the PLVC website.  This then culminated in inviting over 90 organizations to be asked if they wished to be included in the online directory. Some 50 requests were received. The Directory will be available on the Village Council website in October.  Next steps will include providing a similar area on our website where businesses can advertise.

COVID-19 Task ForceCo-Chairs: Kim Moffitt and Jim Moffitt
To provide the entire Port Ludlow Community with information relative to the pandemic that focuses on LOCAL aspects, be a two-way communication conduit between the community and Jefferson County and to be a resource for residents to obtain information.

 The COVID-19 Task force uses the information from our Jeffco local expert sources from Departments of Health and Emergency Management and Jefferson Healthcare. These expert sources are focused mainly on the needs of the JeffCo residents.

Ongoing monitoring of the JeffCo Commissioner’s Weekly Meetings for COVID-19 data updates by Dr. Locke (JeffCo Public Health Officer), along with information from Washington State and the Federal government was performed by the Committee. The goal was to collect information and guidance that was new and not redundant. From that research, Weekly Updates were sent to the Community on the Village Council eblast system.  In addition, the information was shared with partner stakeholders, PLA, SBCA and LMC.  The Emergency Management Block Captain program was used to support Task Force initiatives and messaging.

Emergency Management — Chair: Kim Moffitt
Establish and maintain a disaster-based emergency communications and response organization for Port Ludlow.

2020 has been a busy year for Emergency Management (EM). Some of our planned activities were set aside to respond to the COVID-19 emergency.  Following the actions of the county Department of Emergency Management (DEM) to activate the Emergency Operations Center, the EM Committee initiated a limited activation of our Block Captains to provide support for the community by surveying vulnerable populations for potential needs.  The Committee participated in a COVID-19 Task Force in partnership with the Health and Wellness Committee monitoring the county communications to provide information to the community.

In addition, the Committee has been concentrating on updating the written Port Ludlow Neighborhood Emergency Plan (NEP) to be published on the Village Council website. The plan will serve as guidance and information to the Port Ludlow community for preparation, response, and recovery of any type of emergency that we may face in our area as well as a resource for Block Captains in the performance of their duties.  This NEP has been developed in conjunction with the County DEM.

The Committee is working to recruit block captains, especially in the North Bay area, and is developing an outreach plan with messaging to the Port Ludlow community regarding the Committee’s activities while emphasizing communication with new residents. In order to eliminate some of the in-person interaction, the Committee is developing online training for new and existing block captains. This effort commenced with a radio procedures training session for Block Captains in September.

Health and Wellness Committee – Chair: Jim Moffitt
To provide to our Port Ludlow Community Health and Wellness events sponsored by the Village Council and others.

This has been a challenging year for the Health and Wellness Committee. Starting off with a planned series of three healthy cooking classes with Chef Arron Stark from Jefferson Healthcare, we were only able to accomplish one due to COVID-19.  That one class, held at the Beach Club, was an overwhelming success with 61 residents participating in this very entertaining and educational program. The remaining two demos were postponed due to social distancing protocols and for the benefit and safety of the community and Jefferson Healthcare team members.  On September 14th,  Chef Stark resumed his Healthy Cooking Demos in a virtual format. This was the first of six demos planned over a six consecutive week period. These are accessible via the Jefferson Healthcare Facebook page and online streaming from their website.

The Health and Wellness Committee will continue to explore ways to offer programs that enhance the quality of life in Port Ludlow and will be reaching out to both LMC and SBCA on how to coordinate future activities in the health and wellness area.

Holiday Lights – Chair: Dave McDearmid
Continue to provide holiday lights for the community.

The Committee continued Port Ludlow’s Holiday Lights tradition that has brought sparkle and shine to our Village Center for many years. Up before Thanksgiving, remaining through the winter, we enjoy these decorations throughout the season.  Special thanks go to WAVE Broadband who continue to donate their crews and bucket trucks to help in the loftier elevation of the trees, and to Lakeside Industries for their continued donation of traffic control.  In addition, area businesses and residents, especially in the Village, made monetary donations to enable us to purchase replacement light strings for those that are no longer bright and operating.  None of this would happen without the support of community volunteers who participate in the installation and removal of the lights and the generous financial support of our many donors.

Maritime – Chair: Phil Otness
Monitor boating activity and provide a safe Port Ludlow Bay experience.

The summer season yachters exceeded all expectations with the number of boaters visiting our Bay.  This led to speeding of tenders in conflict with many others using the peaceful waters of our beautiful bay.  The Committee distributed many informational letters or talked to various skippers who were generally cooperative.  Due to excessive speeding, three more signs matching the four already in place around the bay were added.  This time we put them on shoreline and on the twin islands where most of the speeders were originating.  This made a very large difference to change the pattern and protect the many standup paddle boarders as well as kayakers, rowers and other users.

During the early spring, with the help of the DNR, we were able to correspond with several vessels who had exceeded the state anchorage rules which limit an anchorage stay to 30 days.  They volunteered to leave but many exceeded the limit by several weeks.

Recycling – Chair: Austin Kerr
Monitor Recycling Center activity and maintain communication with solid waste removal providers.

The Jefferson County recycling program has experienced no substantial changes in the last year.  The 2020 recycling flyer is posted at the bins to educate the community about recycling and the need for cleanliness for a successful effort. The county’s Solid Waste Advisory Committee has suspended some meetings because of the COVID-19 pandemic.  The Solid Waste department is transitioning to new leadership due to a retirement. The recycling bins in Port Ludlow are an important part of the county’s recycling program.  Port Ludlow Associates provides the location and Skookum services the bins under contract with JeffCo.  There are occasional dumping violations and a failure to flatten cardboard that can fill the bins prematurely.  Occasional failure to follow other guidelines can disrupt processing of material for sale to brokers who find markets for these materials.

Roadway Safety Committee – Chair: Allan Kiesler
Maintain communication with County Department of Public Works to ensure the safety of Port Ludlow residents.

It has been another year of waiting for Jefferson County to respond to our five safety requests for Port Ludlow.  The County-hired consultant has submitted his final report, which the Committee reviewed, and his recommendations were very much in line with our requests.

The two least expensive recommendations were to reduce the speed from 40 the 35 MPH on Paradise Bay Road from Timberton Road to the four-way stop at Oak Bay Road .  The second recommendation was to reconfigure the four-way stop at Osprey, Oak Bay and Paradise Bay Road for safety reasons.

Although not directly in the tasking for the Committee, we have also been monitoring the planned Roundabout at Highway 104 and Paradise Bay Road.  Construction is slated to begin in 2021 and this affects traffic going through Port Ludlow.  The second Roundabout planned for Highway 104 and Highway 19 (Beaver Valley Road) has been planned but probably will not begin in 2021.

Trails and Natural Resources – Chair:  Merrily Mount

Develop and maintain the trails and natural resources of the community and promote community awareness and appreciation of the established walking and biking trails. 

As we look in the mirror of 2020, we continue to be primarily in maintenance mode on our beautiful trail system in Port Ludlow.  We worked throughout the year to complete projects on our trails while following the COVID-19 mandates to stay safe.  Volunteer on-site work for 2020 totaled 1099 hours since the last annual report.

A number of volunteers recently completed training and certification in chainsaw operation and first aid/CPR. Therefore, we have more volunteers to respond to fallen trees on our trail system.

A major beautification and retooling of our Interpretive Garden area, now called “Garden at Ludlow Falls” was completed.  We renegotiated the entrance trail to Ludlow Falls and with the assistance of PLA now have new fencing along the falls area.  Volunteers replaced steps and benches along this trail.  We responded to numerous downed tree reports and we were able to utilize many of these trees for new benches along Camber Lane and at Picnic Point.  The Annual Scotch Broom Pull and new Tansy Ragwort removal effort were completed on an individual basis this year.  The “trails brigade” worked tirelessly to stay ahead of the rapidly growing plants encroaching on the trails.

Trail maintenance agreements have been signed with the trail-owning HOA’s of our community as well with DNR, Rayonier and PLA.  Our maintenance volunteers have signed the agreements’ liability releases and safety guideline forms.

We are determining our future needs.  Revising the Committee’s policies and procedures and long-range plan has been started to give better orientation and guidance to new volunteers.  Our continuing goal is to provide safe and enjoyable trails here in Port Ludlow for the benefit of all our residents.

Utilities – Chair: Robert Chanpong
Monitor private and public utilities as they relate to Port Ludlow and monitor water treatment upgrade project.

Following on the Committee’s work in 2019 to focus on the OWSI Water Treatment Project, in 2020 the project has progressed significantly, gaining approvals from various State and County entities. The project has undergone successful state surcharge hearings, Cultural and Historical Reviews, the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) review, and several engineering reviews. The DOH approved the engineering plan, and the building permit was granted by the County. The bid process for plant construction is ongoing at this time. OWSI estimates that construction should start this October, with completion within two years from start.

PLVC HONOR ROLL 2020

Alblinger, Michele – Community Open House
Bakst, Jay – Emergency Management
Belmont, Brian – Community Open House
Berthiaume, Barbara – Community Open House
Bennett, Diana – Community Open House
Bense, Willie – Emergency Management
Best, Karen – Community Development
Bima, Jamie – Community Open House
Bleek, Jan – Community Open House
Bodman, Fran – Welcome Event
Codier, David – Emergency Management
Corbridge, Bruce – Community Open House
Corbridge, Nancy – Community Open House
Crooks, John – Emergency Management
Darrow, Soozie – Trails/Natural Resources
Dawson, Ron – Emergency Management
Dean, Bill – Officer
Dean, Chris – Community Development
Diehl, Piper – Movie Night
Faulkner, Fred – Emergency Management
Franzel, Philip – Utilities
Franzel, Sally – Officer
Gagnier, Ann – Movie Night
Garcia, Doug – Community Open House
Garcia, Rita – Director
Goldwood, John – Trails/Natural Resources
Govert, Adele – Community Open House
Green, Tink – Emergency Management
Griffith, John – Festival
Griffith, Sheri – Welcome Event
Henry, Russ – Emergency Management
Hicks, Gary – Trails/Natural Resources
Hinton, Paul – Officer
Huber, Doug – Road Safety
James, Barb – Community Open House
Jurca, Dave – Community Development
Kerr, Austin – Utilities/Recycling
Kiesler, Allan – Director
Kiesler, Nancy – Welcome Event
Knudsen, Donna – Community Open House
Lazarus, Bill – Welcome Event
Lohrey, Pat – Emergency Management
Lloyd, Clydene – Community Open House
McClung, Ron – Movie Night
McDearmid, Dave – Community Development
McDearmid, Tam – Director
Merritt, Marlene – Welcome Event
Meryhew, Dick – Roadway Safety
Meryhew, Mary Ellen – Welcome Event
Michel, Russ – Utilities
Moffitt, Anna – Communications
Moffitt, Jack – Communications
Moffitt, Jim – Officer
Moffitt, Kim – Emergency Management
Mount, Merrily – Trails/Natural Resources
Myers, Richard – Trails/Natural Resources
Navone, Jane – Trails/Natural Resources
Nilssen, Mike – Community Development
Otness, Phil – Utilities/Marine
Page, Pat – Emergency Management
Petrick, Dana – Community Development
Ralls, Jan – Movie Night
Rensema, Tim – Trails/Natural Resources
Rothwell, Sandy – Welcome Event
Schurman, Rick – Emergency Management/NOC
Sheldon, Ray – Director
Smeland, Diana – Movie Night
Smith, Rick – Emergency Management
Snider, Kathy – Community Open House
Sprandel, Tom – Director
Stapleton, Kris – Welcome Event
Summerfelt, Caleb – Communications/Archive
Sweet, John – Roadway Safety
Tallerico, Vicki – Welcome Event
Towner, Mike – Officer
Turissini, Danille – Emergency Management
Umbreit, Terry – Holiday Lights
Vannoy, Jackie – Community Open House
Waldenberg, Phyllis -Health & Wellness
Ward, Kori – Movie Night
Wells, Linda – Welcome Event
Wright-Cole, Carol – Welcome Event

First confirmed cases of West Nile Virus reported in Washington

OLYMPIA/YAKIMA – The first two cases of West Nile virus (WNV) in Washington this year have been reported by the Yakima County Health District and Benton-Franklin Health District. The Yakima County resident, a man in his 50’s, was hospitalized due to the infection. The Benton County resident, a man in his 60’s, was not hospitalized.

WNV can be a serious, even fatal, illness. It can affect people, horses, birds, and other animals. WNV is almost always spread to people by the bite of an infected mosquito. Mosquitoes become infected after feeding on birds that carry the virus. There is no evidence that WNV spreads by direct contact with infected people or animals. The majority of people infected with WNV do not get sick. About one in five will develop a fever or other symptoms that go away without medical treatment. Even fewer, about one in 150 people infected, will have more severe symptoms.

Severe symptoms may include headache, high fever, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, paralysis, and coma. If you have any of these symptoms, contact your healthcare provider right away.

Health officials advise people to take action to avoid mosquito bites:

  • Use an effective, EPA-registered insect repellent.
  • Cover up: Wear long sleeves, long pants, and socks when outdoors.
  • Avoid mosquito prime time. Many mosquitoes bite in the evening between dusk and dawn. Take extra care to use repellent and protective clothing during evening and morning hours.
  • Mosquito-proof your home by installing or repairing screens on windows and doors to keep mosquitos outside.
  • Reduce mosquito-breeding areas around your home by emptying standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, discarded tires, and birdbaths on a regular basis.

“Spending time outdoors can help with social distancing to prevent COVID-19, but it can also put you at risk for mosquito-borne disease,” said epidemiologist Hanna Oltean. “People throughout Washington should take precautions to prevent mosquito bites.”

WNV has been detected this summer in mosquitos in Yakima, Benton, and Franklin counties; historically, counties across Washington have been affected, although risk is generally highest in Eastern Washington. WNV season starts as early as July and can last until early October.

INSLEE ANNOUNCES EDUCATION RECOMMENDATIONS FOR 2020–2021 SCHOOL YEAR

Gov. Jay Inslee today announced new recommendations from the Washington State Department of Health for resuming in-person instruction in public and private K-12 education for the upcoming 2020–2021 school year. Inslee was joined by Chris Reykdal, state Superintendent of Public Instruction at a press conference.

Similar to the state’s county-by-county phased approach to reopening, the plan allows local health departments and school districts decide if and how they will allow students back in the classroom.

“We know the uncertainty surrounding school reopening is a source of extraordinary anxiety for parents and educators — anxiety not just about whether it’s safe to go back to school in person, but also about the impacts to children if they don’t return to the classroom,” Inslee said.

The plan includes several different considerations for deciding whether or not to return to in-person learning, but no matter the county, when COVID-19 infection rates are high, the state strongly recommends school districts move to mostly online or remote learning.

Read the rest of the story on the governor’s Medium page.

INSLEE ANNOUNCES ROLLBACKS TO SOME ACTIVITIES TO SLOW COVID-19 EXPOSURE

COVID-19 WEEKLY UPDATE JUNE 30, 2020

This update is published each Tuesday following the report by County Medical Director, Dr. Thomas Locke, to the County Commissioners and summarizes significant points from that meeting and other information that has not been previously reported in PLVC eBlasts. Topics are listed in summary form with links to Web pages such as PLVC at www.plvc.org/covid-19 or Washington State Hotline at Phone: 800-525-0127 – at prompt press #.
Roadmap to Reopening: (We are now in Phase II – have applied for Phase III)
  • JeffCo forwarded its Phase III re-opening application to the Washington State Department of Health on 06/29/20 – see PLVC website above for Board of Health details. Increased numbers of individuals allowed for various activities are included. Some additional limits on indoor gatherings may be imposed when Phase III is actually implemented.
  • It is expected that the turnaround response will not be as quick as the Phase II application and will take up to 7 to 10 business days to hear back
  • It is expected that we will be in Phase III, at minimum, through the balance of 2020 – or perhaps longer
  • Dr. Locke’s ongoing messaging:
  • Masking Protocols – must be followed
  • Distance – Social Distancing Protocols must be followed both indoors and outdoors
  • Hand Hygiene – wash hands frequently
  • No face touching
More information on Safe Start Washington can be found via this link:
Advisories:
  • New testing procedures being explored:
  • Pool testing – this is group testing
  • A sample of individuals in the pool is tested
  • If tests come back negative – all is good
  • If tests come back positive, then everyone in that pool (group) is tested individually to find out which one(s) are positive
  • The pool testing procedure will allow a greater quantity of testing to be completed with faster contact tracing opportunities
  • Masking:
  • Research has found face shields to be effective
  • Suggested to be used with some sort of bandana for absorption benefit of moisture and airborne particles
  • In combination with face mask – more effective than shield alone
  • Use of face shields would be considered following the WA State masking orders/directives
Department of Emergency Management (DEM) Updates (Willie Bence):
  • State EOC has been contacted about support on face shield or clear face masks for those with disabilities that require lip reading, etc.
  • There is a need for smaller sized face masks for children outside of the exempted age range
  • Jefferson Health is in good supply of PPE and bed capacity should a surge occur
  • It was also noted that masking compliance in the county is good and getting better
  • However, there are residents that are not properly wearing their masks
  • To keep yourselves and others safe, the mask needs to fully cover both the nose and mouth

Rayonier Spraying Around Teal Lake

Toxicity

Triclopyr herbicide products are labeled by the EPA with the signal word “Caution” which translates to low toxicity.  It is also a Group D chemical which means it is not classifiable as a carcinogen. It is non-toxic to bees but highly toxic to fish.

Mode of Action

The effects of Triclopyr mimic that of plant growth hormones, interfering with the normal growing process.  It is absorbed by leaves, roots, cut stems or green bark and moves through the plant to accumulate in the growth region of plant where it is able to disrupt further growth.

Uses

Triclopyr is registered for use on rice, pasture and rangeland, lawns, right-of-ways, and forests.

Products Containing Triclopyr

Battleship III Herbicide – 2.5 gallon
Fertilome Brush Killer and Stump Killer
Confront Herbicide
Crossbow Herbicide

JEFFERSON COUNTY LOCAL HEALTH OFFICER DIRECTIVE REGARDING COVID-19; REQUIRING THE WEARING OF CLOTH FACE COVERINGS 05/28/2020

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Thomas Locke, MD, MPH, Local Health Officer for Jefferson County, under the authority of RCW 70.05.070, RCW 43.20.050, and WAC 246-100-036, make the following DIRECTIVE:

  1. Use of Cloth Face Coverings. All individuals must wear face coverings over their noses and mouths when they will be at (1) indoor public settings, or (2) outdoor public locations and cannot maintain distancing of approximately six feet from another individual who does not share their household. Because there is still a shortage of medical-grade or N95 respirators for health care workers, unless a particular health reason requires it, individuals should use fabric coverings, such as cloth face masks, scarves and bandana coverings or other material as recommended by CDC. Cloth face masks must be worn properly in order to avoid contaminating the hands or face of the user. Before putting on a mask and after removing a mask, an individual should clean their hands with alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water and change masks when moist and wash after use. While in use, avoid touching the mask. Worn masks may be contaminated with infectious agents. Wearing of cloth face coverings should not be required for the following individuals: (a) any child under two years of age; (b) any child who is at least two and less than twelve years of age unless a parent or caregiver supervises the use of cloth face coverings by children to avoid misuse; (c) any individual who is unable to remove the cloth face covering without assistance; (d) any individual who is deaf and uses facial and mouth movements as part of communication; or (e) any individual who has been advised by a medical professional that wearing a face covering may pose a risk to that individual for health reasons.
  2. Cloth Face Coverings Required. Owners and operators of businesses in Jefferson County shall not permit or allow any non-employee to enter or remain inside a building owned or operated by the business unless the non-employee is wearing a cloth face covering over their mouth and nostrils. This does not apply to a restaurant, tavern, or bar patron while eating or drinking. Further, businesses that sell food, medicine, or medical supplies shall provide a method for customers to purchase these items without entering a building, such as curbside pick-up or delivery. 3. Notice by Businesses, Ports, and Marina Facilities. Owners and operators of all businesses, ports, and/or marina facilities in Jefferson County shall post notice at entry points indicating that the wearing of cloth face coverings is required inside businesses in Jefferson County. Said notice shall be posted no later than 7 days after Jefferson County begins full implementation of Phase II of the Safe Start Washington plan as authorized by the Governor or Washington Secretary of Health. This paragraph does not require posting of notice by a business that is not open to the public.
  3. Notice by Businesses, Ports, and Marina Facilities. Owners and operators of all businesses, ports, and/or marina facilities in Jefferson County shall post notice at entry points indicating that the wearing of cloth face coverings is required inside businesses in Jefferson County. Said notice shall be posted no later than 7 days after Jefferson County begins full implementation of Phase II of the Safe Start Washington plan as authorized by the Governor or Washington Secretary of Health. This paragraph does not require posting of notice by a business that is not open to the public.

JEFFERSON COUNTY IN PHASE 2 OF “SAFE START” REOPENING PLAN 05/26/2020

Jefferson County in Phase 2 of “Safe Start” Reopening Plan
On May 23, Jefferson County received approval to move into Phase 2 of Governor Inslee’s “Safe Start” phased approach for resuming recreational, social and business activities, subject to conditions. Every phase will still require social distancing and appropriate health precautions including the use of personal protective equipment in a number of workplaces. Use of a cloth face covering is strongly recommended. Guidance and safety criteria for reopening can be found on the “Safe Start” webpage. Camping and indoor retail sales in Jefferson County remain prohibited until additional neighboring counties also enter Phase 2. See the tables below for what’s open and what’s not.

What’s Open, What’s Closed?